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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Rainforest Plant Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 63 pictures in our Rainforest Plant collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Five majestic Moreton Bay fig trees (Ficus macrophylla) on Headstone Road on Norfolk Island Featured Print

Five majestic Moreton Bay fig trees (Ficus macrophylla) on Headstone Road on Norfolk Island

Five majestic Moreton Bay fig trees (Ficus macrophylla) on Headstone Road on Norfolk Island, their buttress roots forming a popular backdrop for holiday and wedding photos. The trees are thought to be over 200 years old. Norfolk Island, Southwest Pacific, Australia

© Copyright Ian Beattie/AUSCAPE All rights reserved

Australian, Buttresses, Evergreen, External Territory, Giant, Important Bird Food, Massive, Monoecious, Plant, Rainforest Plant, Tourist Attraction, Tree, Vegetation

Native poplar (Homalanthus populifolius) Featured Print

Native poplar (Homalanthus populifolius)

Native poplar (Homalanthus populifolius), its 5 to 15 cm-long leaves turn red when aging, hence its other common name of Bleeding heart. Lamington National Park, southern Queensland, Australia

Amalanthus Popiliofolius, Australian, Bleeding Heart, Bleeding Heart Tree, Cordate, Flora, Foliage, Gondwana Rainforests Of Australia, Heart Shaped Leaves, Leaves, Malpighiales, Native, New Guinea Plant, Omalanthus Nutans, Pinnate Venation, Plant, Plants In The Wild, Queensland Poplar, Rainforest Plant, Veins, World Heritage Area

Forest of Pencil pines (Athrotaxis cupressoides) Featured Print

Forest of Pencil pines (Athrotaxis cupressoides)

Forest of Pencil pines (Athrotaxis cupressoides), at 1300 m above sea level. The ancient species, adapted to the harsh climate of the Tasmanian highland plateau, is threatened by increased risk of fire due to human activities plus a warmer, drier climate. In the background are the results of a fire in 1960-1961 which burnt in the peat for many weeks, virtually destroying thousands of hectares of Pencil pine forest. That fire was described as 'arguably the most ecologically significant fire to be recorded throughout Australian history' (Malcolm Gill). The forest has made little progress to recovery after 46 years. Walls of Jerusalem National Park, Tasmania, Australia