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Home > Images Dated > 2019 > May > 23 May 2019

Images Dated 23rd May 2019

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 296 pictures in our Images Dated 23rd May 2019 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


A mid-1950s picture of the old Hobart Bridge, a floating bridge about a kilometre Featured 23 May 2019 Print

A mid-1950s picture of the old Hobart Bridge, a floating bridge about a kilometre

A mid-1950s picture of the old Hobart Bridge, a floating bridge about a kilometre long between the east shore and the city. Its vertical lift span allowed quite large ships to go to the upstream zinc works, making a spectacle for halted road travellers when ships went through at some speed. Its arch design strengthened it against high river currents. On wild days waves would break over it as it rode up and down with the waves. It was replaced in 1964. Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

Snow gums (Eucalyptus pauciflora) Featured 23 May 2019 Print

Snow gums (Eucalyptus pauciflora)

Snow gums (Eucalyptus pauciflora). on the once scenic Lake Mountain cross-country ski trail, blackened by bushfires 18 months before. It will be a long time until recovery. Snow gums regrow from the ground, not from the trunk and branches as do many other eucalypts. Marysville, Victoria, Australia

Alpine Habitat, Alpine Snow Gum, Australian, Cabbage Ash, Cabbage Gum, Eucalypt, Eucalyptus, Flora, Gum Tree, Gumtree, High Altitude, Montane, Myrtaceae, Myrtales, Plant, Snow, Snow Gums, Snowy, Stark, Subalpine Climate, Tree, Trees, Vegetation, Weeping Gum, White Sallee

Death of a species: Tasmanian cider gum (Eucalyptus gunnii divaricata) Featured 23 May 2019 Print

Death of a species: Tasmanian cider gum (Eucalyptus gunnii divaricata)

Death of a species: Tasmanian cider gum (Eucalyptus gunnii divaricata), tree that has died because of its unsuitability to today's dryer, warmer climate, also in part because of grazing livestock, deer and rabbits. Only one or two thousand Tasmanian cider gums now survive. Central Highlands, Tasmania, Australia